Hotel Savoy

6 Traugutta St.

General

The city of Lodz, was vigorously developing before the outbreak of World War I, and still did not have a sufficient number of satisfactorily high standard hotels.

It is not surprising, therefore When in 1911, a modern Savoy Hotel was built at 6 Krótka Street (presently Traugutta) it should come as no surprise that excited correspondent of a Warsaw Magazine Świat, called it “Europe in Lodz”. 

History

The Building was designed by a District Architect, Stefan Lemmené. It was built in less than two years by developers from Warsaw and Katowice. The building was located on a narrow, rectangular lot of land by the street connected to Piotrkowska.

Savoy’s building is a representation of the esthetics of the time, combining Secessionist and Modernistic elements. Lateral, semicircular bay windows and few narrow balconies subtly stand out from the leveled facade. Glazed shop windows were installed on the ground floor and big, square windows on the first floor. Round window, located above the entrance, in the middle of the first storey is a very characteristic detail. It is decorated with a metal frame on which embossed are two long-tailed peacocks, birds - symbols of Secession.

Also the interior design and modern equipment had to make an excellent impression. The hotel had electrical lamps in multicolored lampshades, running water, sewage system, elevator, phones and pool tables. “Even the most particular/refined travelers will be satisfied with the newly opened Savoy Hotel, comfortably furnished and technologically advanced.” – wrote a contemporary journalist, whose opinion is cited by Jarosław Skowroński, author of a preface to the novel “Hotel Savoy”. Such an exceptional place was quickly noticed by writers. The story of a book from 1924, by an Austrian writer of Jewish origin - Josef Roth - takes place in the hotel. The main character of a novel, Gabriel Dan, coming back from the long wanderings in Russia, stops in the nameless industrial city, in a hotel located at Krótka Street. Roth described Savoy as “the gateway of Europe”, writing: “Magnificent hotel with the liveried doorman, gold signboard, elevators and clean maids in white, starched bonnets seems more European than all the Eastern Inns.” It is important to mention that those praises were written by a man, who was very critical towards the city itself, describing it as follows: “Before noon [the city] was grey, above it hung the smoke coming out from giant chimneys of Polish factories; dirty beggars sat crouched on the street corners; garbage and dung were covering narrow streets”.

Events

Today, Hotel Savoy is one of the three historical Lodz hotels operating since the beginning of the 20th century. The construction of a 35 meters high building, at that time a vertiginous height, was possible due to the skeletal structure. Hotel had 6 floors, however, because of a high ground floor with a mezzanine and the attic, thought to have 7.  Against small buildings around it, Savoy building looked like a real “skyscraper“, “Lodz first high-rise” – as it was described at the time. Indeed, Until a high-rise of a the television was built in the center, in 1951, the hotel of the Viennese financier, Salomon Ringer, was one of the tallest secular buildings in Lodz.

Today (29.12.1989 Onwards)

Today, Hotel Savoy is one of the three historical Lodz hotels operating since the beginning of the 20th century. The construction of a 35 meters high building, at that time a vertiginous height, was possible due to the skeletal structure. Hotel had 6 floors, however, because of a high ground floor with a mezzanine and the attic, thought to have 7.  Against small buildings around it, Savoy building looked like a real “skyscraper“, “Lodz first high-rise” – as it was described at the time. Indeed, Until a high-rise of a the television was built in the center, in 1951, the hotel of the Viennese financier, Salomon Ringer, was one of the tallest secular buildings in Lodz.

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Notes

The above text was written by Joanna Podolska and had been made available by her courtesy.

Architect:

Stefan Lemmené (born 1864) – graduated Łowicz Gymnasium, studied in Saint-Petersburg. Throughout his documented professional career, he worked for the Russian Administration – firstly at the Piotrków General Governorate Department for Construction as an additional construction technician, for a while as an assistant of the Lodz City Architect - Hilary Majewski. After 1911, he took a position at the Saint-Petersburg Technical and Building Committee of the Ministry of Interior. Later, he came back to Warsaw. It is hard to assess his achievements, since as an administration official, he could sign off projects of other architects.

Stamp Information

Country Polska Polska
City Lodz Lodz
Address 6 Traugutta St.
Street Name Changes Until 1939: Krótka 1939 – 1945: Straße der 8. Armee After 1945: Traugutta
Monument Register Number A/102, B/28
Architectural Style Elements of Secession and Modernism
Architect(s) Stefan Lemmené
Number of Floors 7
Construction Start 1909
Construction Completion 1911
Planned Use Hotel
First Owner Salomon Ringer
Successive Owner(s) City Hotels Company (1946-1974), Tourist Company "Lodz" (1974-2008) The current owner of the center-Hotels Sp. o.o. (Since 2008)


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